FAQ

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Personal Banking

How can your rates be so good?

First Internet Bank is a pioneer in the ‘direct banking’ model. We’ve been around since 1999. Without a costly branch network to support, we’re able to pass our savings on to you in the form of better rates and lower fees. Plus, we’ve loaded up our online banking site with tools and resources to help you manage your money more easily and make smart financial choices for your future. And when you have a question, our experienced and friendly Relationship Bankers are happy to help – by phone, email or online chat. Chances are, with Direct Deposit and ATMs, you probably don’t visit bank branches that often anyway…so why pay for something you don’t use?

Am I ever required to take distributions from my Traditional IRA?

Traditional IRA distributions become mandatory beginning in the year that a Traditional IRA owner turns age 70½. These mandatory distributions are called required minimum distributions (RMDs). IRA owners must begin taking RMDs by April 1 of the year following the year they turn 70½. These distributions are based on the IRA balance divided by the applicable distribution period. Because IRAs were created to provide income during retirement—not to be a tax shelter— IRA owners failing to take their RMDs are subject to a 50 percent excess accumulation penalty tax on the assets that should have been distributed but were not.

How do I make deposits to my personal account?

In today’s wireless world, you no longer have to make deposits in person. First Internet Bank offers multiple ways to deposit your funds electronically or through our mobile app.

How are interest rates determined?

Interest rates fluctuate based on a variety of factors, including inflation, the pace of economic growth and Federal Reserve policy. Over time, inflation has the largest influence on the level of interest rates. A modest rate of inflation will almost always lead to low interest rates, while concerns about rising inflation normally cause interest rates to increase. Our nation’s central bank, the Federal Reserve, implements policies designed to keep inflation and interest rates relatively low and stable.